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Recipe
See Ingredients

Romanian Chicken in Tomato Sauce

1. If you are using a whole chicken, remove the breasts and cut each in half, remove the legs and cut them at the knee to give you two drumsticks and two upper thighs, and remove the wings. If you like, you can make a good stock out of the carcass for a chicken soup or for adding to the sauce later if it is a little thick.
2. Dredge the chicken pieces in the seasoned flour and put them in the pan, in which you have heated up the oil/butter to a moderate temperature. Let each side brown and turn them. Once browned all over, remove to a dish. Cook in batches if necessary.
3. Into the same pan, throw the onion and allow to soften, stirring frequently, for a couple of minutes. Then add the garlic and cook for another minute or two. Use a wooden spoon to mix them well with the chicken-flavoured oil and the bits of remaining flour.
4. Deglaze the pan with a glass of white wine, scraping the side and mixing well. Turn up the heat a little and allow the wine to reduce until the smell coming off the pan is less alcoholic and the sauce is a little thicker.
5. Pour in the tomatoes and their juices, the bay leaves and the thyme, and bring back to the boil. Once it has returned to the boil, reduce to a gentle simmer and cook for 5 minutes, stirring to combine all the ingredients. Once the sauce is well mixed, put the chicken pieces back in, cover the pan, and simmer on a low heat for about 15-20 minutes. Check the thicker pieces of chicken after this time to see if they are cooked to the centre nd continue cooking if they are still pink.
6. Once all the chicken pieces are thoroughly cooked, remove them to the serving dish. If the sauce is a little thick, you can add a few splashes of stock. if it’s a little thin, you can add a knob of butter and a tablespoon of flour and thicken it up. The sauce forostropel is usually quite thin – not quite soup, but not a thick gloopy sauce.
7. Serve the ostropel de pui with mamaliga (polenta) or mashed potatoes, and a hot chilli pepper on the side.

 

Source: http://romanianfoodblog.blogspot.dk/

Recipe

Cauliflower Croquettes

Meatballs of various types are an integral part of Romanian cuisine and the word chiftea (pl. chiftele) (pronounced /kif-te-a/ – /kif-te-le/) is clearly an indication of their Turkish origin, the word being a corruption of the Turkish kofte and related to the Middle Eastern kafta. In the Moldavian region of Romania they are also commonly known as parjoale (/pur-joa-le/) although these seem to be a little larger in size than the standard Romanian chiftea. Due to the preference for pork in the Romanian diet, these meatballs are most commonly composed of pork, perhaps in combination with some beef. Lamb chiftele are quite rare in Romanian cuisine. These cauliflower croquettes have a moist, light interior and, if cooked right, a crispy coating. Cauliflower is more usually pickled in Romanian or the whole florets are battered and fried.

Recipe

Carinthian Cheese Noodles

The borders between today’s Austria and its southern neighbours are particularly dissipating in Carinthia. Instead of drizzling with melted butter, here the famous ʼKasnudelʼ are topped with melted Sasaka: the word comes from the Slovenian language and simply means finely-diced bacon or a type of lardons. Besides being a wonderfully spicy spread for bread, it also figures prominently in Styrian cuisine, proving that the colorful culinary merry-go-round in the former territories of the Habsburg Monarchy is still vibrant today.

Recipe

Ghent Waterzooi

Waterzooi is a classic stew of Flanders. Its name is Dutch, ʼzooienʼ meaning ʼto boilʼ. It is sometimes called Gentse Waterzooi (in Dutch) which refers to the city of Ghent. The original recipe is made of fish, either freshwater or sea, though today chicken waterzooi is more common. The most accepted theory is that rivers of Ghent became too polluted and the fish disappeared. The stew is made of the fish or chicken, vegetables including carrots, leeks and potatoes, herbs, eggs, cream and butter and usually serbed as a soup with a baquette to sop up the liquid.

Ingredients

  • 1 whole chicken (or a pack of your favourite parts)
  • 1/2 a cup of plain flour, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • Cooking oil (olive oil, butter, vegetable oil)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic, crushed, chopped, or sliced
  • 1 glass of white wine
  • 800g of chopped peeled tomatoes (or 2 cans if fresh tomatoes are not available)
  • 1 or 2 bay leaves
  • A few sprigs of thyme
  • A little stock (optional)